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Unexploded WWII Bomb found in River Thames near London City Airport

Unexploded WWII Bomb found in River Thames near London City Airport

An unexploded bomb from WWII was discovered in the River Thames last Sunday. The authorities had to cancel all flights Monday out of neighboring .

The bomb was discovered during some pre-planned work for the airport. The Royal Navy and specialists alike confirmed that it was a German, 500-kg (,100-pound) device with a fuse coming out of it, reported local authorities. Until the device was lifted and removed, nobody was permitted to start work around it.

On Sunday evening, the Royal Navy and the police evacuated people within about 700 feet of the bomb, reported NPR. There were 261 arrivals and departures for the airport on Monday, noted the BBC. Up to 16,000 passengers were affected. By Monday evening, the authorities had removed the bomb from the area. Thankfully, no one was injured.

The for the evacuation, in addition to the immediate danger posed by a normal bomb, is rooted in the nature of a WWII Nazi bomb. The Nazis dropped all kinds of bombs during the war, but some were booby trapped to only go off when someone tried to defuse them. And visually, there was nothing differentiating these from unexploded duds.

From the BBC:

But according to a spokesman for the RLC regiment’s EOD division, high explosive, air-delivered German bombs are the most dangerous World War II items it has to deal with. Not only are they in a sensitive state – having already been deployed, armed and damaged by the impact with the ground – but they are fitted with a variety of different fuses, some designed to detonate immediately, others which featured some form of time-delay and some which were booby trapped, specially designed to kill EOD operators.

Of course, finding old and unexploded WWII-era bombs in London really isn’t all that unusual. German planes dropped almost 30,000 bombs on the city over the course of three months during the BlitzNPR reported. And it’s not just London either. Each year, over 2,000 tons of unexploded bombs are found in Germany, despite the war ending some 70 years ago, reports Smithsonian.

And, as it turns out, leftover war bombs have a nasty habit of turning up where people least want them to. There was that time some 1,200 residents were evacuated in London when a construction crew unearthed a 500-pound German air-dropped bomb. And that other time when an American Civil War-era cannonball was discovered in Savannah, Georgia.

Credits: https://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/unexploded-wwii-bomb-found-in-river-near-london-city-ai-1822970067

———————————– HISTORY ———————————-

The Blitz In London – A Million Homes Hit And 40,000 Civilians Killed

St Paul’s Cathedral miraculously escaped WWII air raids

The Blitz (from the German word, ‘lightning’) was the most intense bombing campaign Britain has ever seen. Between 7 September 1940 and 21 May 1941 there were major raids with more than 100 tonnes of high explosives were dropped on 16 British cities. London, was attacked 71 times and bombed by the Luftwaffe for 57 consecutive nights by a total of 30,000 bombs. More than one million London houses were destroyed or damaged, and more than 40,000 civilians were killed, almost half of them in London.

Birmingham, Liverpool and Plymouth were also hit eight times, Bristol six, Glasgow five, Southampton four, Portsmouth three, and there was also at least one large raid on another eight cities. Experts say it is impossible to know just how many unexploded bombs they’re could still be lurking in our towns and cities.

Deeply-buried shelters provided the most protection against a direct hit, although the government in 1939 refused to allow tube stations to be used as shelters so as not to interfere with commuter and troop travel. However, by the second week of heavy bombing the government relented and ordered the stations to be opened.

Each day orderly lines of people queued until 4pm, when they were allowed to enter the stations, and by mid-September 1939 about 150,000 a night slept in the Underground. Despite the blanket bombing of the capital, some landmarks remained intact – such as St Pauls Cathedral, which was virtually unharmed, despite many buildings around it being reduced to rubble during the 57 nights of raid.

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4137106/Waterloo-Westminster-bridges-closed-WWII-bomb.

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Unexploded WWII Bomb found in River Thames near London City Airport
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Unexploded WWII Bomb found in River Thames near London City Airport
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An unexploded bomb from WWII was discovered in the River Thames last Sunday. The authorities had to cancel all flights Monday out of neighboring London City Airport.
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